A Cool New Way to Learn Morse Code

Wow, I found this cool new way to learn Morse Code.  I’m not sure what it’s called, and I wish it was around when I learned Morse Code, but it’s pretty awesome.

Basically, Morse Code can be learned pretty easily visually.  Once you have the visual Morse Code learned pretty well, you then need to start LISTENING for Morse Code.  (You can look on the products section of this website to find kits and the such to help you learn to listen to Morse Code…)

I learned Morse Code out of an encyclopedia.  It took me only about 2 hours of actual memorization.  We used to pass noted in grade school written in Morse Code, and the coding/decoding also helped me to learn and retain it.

Anyways, back to the cool new way of learning Morse Code – check out this image:

Learn Morse Code the Visual Way

Learn Morse Code the Visual Way

If you memorize each letter individually, and then think back to it later, it’ll be somewhat easier to learn Morse Code.  The only problem is timing – for instance, look at the Y.  Y in Morse Code is “-.–” which is said, “dah-dit-dah-dah.”  It’s tough to see in the picture above that the Morse Code Y should be that way, but at least you know that there are three lines and one dash, or three dah’s and one dit.

Does that make sense?

6 Comments

  • By Steve Smith - G0TDJ, December 31, 2010 @ 4:48 pm

    That is facinating, I used a similar method when I was learning Morse Code (now almost 20 years ago). I never really thought about telling anyone.

    73 de Steve – G0TDJ

  • By Mike/KD6FTR, February 13, 2011 @ 9:07 pm

    Looks pretty good from a memorization stand point. What about the numbers and other characters? Where’d you find the PNG file?

    73//Mike

  • By Greg Clifford, March 31, 2011 @ 10:08 pm

    If you want to learn to use morse code well and be fast at it don’t learn it visually, learn it by sound. I learned it visually with cute little pictures in grade school and was never able to get past about 10 wpm because my brain was always first hearing it, then seeing it, then writing it. The extra step in processing slowed me down according to an old ham operator. The way he put it was “when you hear quack, you automatically want to think duck.”

  • By Tony, July 12, 2011 @ 4:36 am

    Hi, all, don’t lift finger from key at end of letter as this chap does,don’t ever think in terms of “dot dash” think only di dah with “dit” as a transition sound like H “didididit” K dahdidah”…thinking dashes and dots is counter-productive. Email me for a couple of hints on learning code if you want.

  • By Tony, July 12, 2011 @ 4:47 am

    Andy is awesome?…well I don’t know but he’s at least a starter and pleasant….He’d do better to get rid of that dot dash beginning but he does move aware from it as time progresses. You MUST learn to stop reading the morse symbols to visualise a letter and just hear a letter, it’s just another language in which letters together become words and eventually, which you must watch, you’ll see yourself anticipating phrases and expressions as common usuage is pretty universal and one does that. When someone says ‘the quick brown fox’ we think “jumped over the lazy dog” but he mightactually be saying “was slowed down by arthritis”, if you get my drift. Like any language practice, don’t let the brain saying “stop, this is borong/too hard” deter you, learn to control your mind by persistance and listening to cw broadcasts from WIA, ARRL. RSGB Hams. Cheers –… …–

  • By admin, July 12, 2011 @ 12:50 pm

    Hehe, that video has had a ton of views but no one has ever figured out the beginning :) Very good! Yes, I agree, people should not be visualizing, and people should not be hearing “dots” and “dashes,” but at the same time, the audience I cater to has no understanding of Morse Code. They have heard Morse Code being referred to as dots and dashes, so learning Morse Code initially starts that way. Thanks for the comments!!!!!

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